Part of this evening was spent coming to the defense of fellow vegan, Foodeater, during a hate rant from someone named Mojo at this blog post. Angry omnivores making hateful jabs on vegan blogs continues to amaze me. Why do they bother? Do they just have a need to lash out because they’re having a bad day and don’t think a vegan will fight back? Are they all wife-beaters? Are they all male? Are they all members of the NRA? I guess it shouldn’t amaze me that it happens. But it does surprise me when they get meaner if you defend yourself. Not very sporting. Maybe they just didn’t get enough hugs as youngsters. Or maybe their mothers didn’t teach them any manners.

I’ve often wondered if they’re actually closet vegans, similar to homophobics who rant against gays and yet get aroused when watching gay porn in clinical studies. Yep, that’s gotta be it, they’re threatened by something they’re curious about, they must be…bi-foodies!!! Yep, closeted vegans at heart.

Anyway, I was on my way to taking a break from Mojo’s desperate rant about vegans who eat fake meats and intended to make a simple quinoa black bean salad for lunch tomorrow, when lo…behold…I made 3 quinoa dishes, one with fake meat. Groovy! (Sidenote: “Awesome” is now banned from my vocabulary due to Palin’s overuse.) Here’s a quick run down of what I just made, photos will have to come later once my camera batteries recharge:

  1. quinoa with sauteed onions and asparagus
  2. quinoa with sauteed onions, black beans, tomatoes and Upton’s Naturals Italian Sausage-Style Seitan
  3. several cups of leftover quinoa with sauteed onions for use as a base in bento lunches this week

The following not-accurately-measured recipe yields all 3 of the above:

Julia’s 3 Quinoa Recipes in One

  1. Melt butter and saute onion in deep sauce pot until onion starts to get crispy. Salt onion while cooking, go easy on the salt though. You’ve got broth coming in the next step.
  2. Add rinsed quinoa and give it a stir with the onion, then add broth.
  3. Bring to boil, cover, lower heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. While that’s cooking, saute the seitan crumbles in a skillet with a tad of oil or butter.
  5. Add black beans and tomatoes to skillet.
  6. Cook the skillet mixture for a bit until tomatoes wilt and beans aren’t shiny.
  7. When the quinoa is done, scoop out about 3 cups into the skillet with the beans and mix with a spoon. I didn’t measure accurately on the 3 cups, I just used a measuring cup as my scooper without leveling.
  8. Transfer bean dish to storage container or bowl and wipe skillet.
  9. Add a tad more oil to the skillet and saute the asparagus, with a little salt.
  10. When asparagus is bright green, dump a couple cups of the quinoa into the skillet again and give it a good toss. Here’s your second dish.
  11. Lastly, you’ll have several cups of onion quinoa to serve with veggies or another topping in your lunch pail.

The bean quinoa is my fave because the Italian seitan adds so much spunk, but a nice sauteed asparagus quinoa is not to be missed. One recipe yields several dishes to have on hand for lunch.

Other ingredients I thought about adding but was too lazy to chop are:

  • celery and cilantro for the black bean dish
  • fresh dill for the plain quinoa
  • chopped kalamata olives to turn the plain quinoa into yet a third dish

And don’t forget, quinoa can easily replace your brown rice or couscous and supply you with all the essential amino acids, vitamin B and calcium. It’s a supergrain afterall.

In Chicago, you can get Upton’s Naturals Italian Sausage-Style Seitan at The Green Grocer. Upton’s is amazing. I’m floored at how spicy it is and with so few ingredients.

Don’t forget, tomorrow is Green Grocer’s class on storing foods for the winter.